A Deep Sand Bed for your saltwater aquarium is one of The Most Effective Filtration Methods.

A Deep Sand Bed for your saltwater aquarium is one of The Most Effective Filtration Methods.

A Deep Sand Bed for your saltwater aquarium is one of The Most Effective Filtration Methods you can have. A deep sand bed is probably one of the most common additions to live rock filtration utilized within the marine aquarium.

What best determines the saltwater tank’s sand bed filtration capabilities is the sand particle size and the depth of the sand bed.

It’s beneficial to utilize sand particles in a deep sand bed which are normally below 0.2mm but above 0.05mm. The smaller the sand particle the better. Never use crushed coral as a sand bed. Crushed coral will trap uneaten fish food and fish waste. This waste will rot in your water, causing all kinds of issues for your saltwater fish and coral.

This is one of the best sand brands for adding a sand bed to your saltwater aquarium. A majority of saltwater aquarium sand beds run between 1″-2″ deep.

No matter what type of substrate (sand) you use in your saltwater aquarium, there will be organisms which will make this their home. A great many of these beneficial organisms are what keep your saltwater aquarium thriving.

The granular size of 0.05mm to 0.2mm being so small allows the various organisms to be able to move around the sand as they wish without being hindered in any way, therefore they are able to consume detritus (fish waste) contained within the sand as long as there are enough organisms actually present.

The sand bed, regardless of depth, must get ‘turned over’. What this means is that while the creatures who call the sand bed their home are busy burrowing around looking for food to eat the sand is actually being moved around due to their burrowing activities. Turning over a sand bed is very important, as it stops any dead areas from forming. Another important aspect of turning over a sand bed is that saltwater can penetrate very slowly through the sand bed, fostering further bacterial colonization.

Live sand is sand which is full of the valuable life which all saltwater aquariums need. It goes without saying that LIVE SAND is also deep within the oceans. Live sand can be used in a deep sand bed as long as the particle size is correct.

When a sand bed starts to get deeper than 2+ inches, then anaerobic areas will start to form. Anaerobic areas in a sand bed are areas which are very low in oxygen content, this is because the oxygen is being used by the aerobic bacteria above. Water flow through these lower areas occurs partly because of the burrowing activities of the organisms which live in the sand, but is primarily due to an activity called diffusion. All fluids have a tendency to perform diffusion. Diffusion is basically where two amounts of the same fluid which contain a different amount of chemicals balance themselves out over time via utilizing the movement of molecules.

It is these anaerobic areas which allow for denitrifying bacteria to function and convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, which will escape the aquarium at the water surface.

So an effective deep sand bed has the ability, because of grain size, depth and various organisms, to permit both nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria to co-exist and continuously break down matter all the way through to the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas.

When a deep sand bed is combined with live rock in the marine aquarium, any solid waste which settles upon the sand is broken down via the deep sand bed and the rest is cycled via the live rock’s excellent filtration capabilities – a match made in heaven.

Leaving live rock out of the equation though when a deep sand bed matures the following will happen:

  1. Waste is broken down when it lands upon the surface of the bed either via bacterial processing or via organism consumption.
  2. The upper layer is so oxygen rich that ammonia and nitrite is converted into nitrate.
  3. At the same time the nitrate concentration is being converted into nitrogen gas the nitrate created in the upper layers is ‘pulled’ down into the lower layers of the sand bed.
  4. When the nitrate reaches the lower levels it is converted into nitrogen gas.
  5. The nitrogen gas which is created rises through the sand and diffuses into the water column before being released into the air at the water surface.
  6. The cycle continues.

A deep sand bed has a never ending biological filtration cycle which is complete all the way through to the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas. The majority of other filtration methods such as water changes or tank filters help to filter the saltwater tank.

In a deep sand bed nitrate levels can be kept so low that even professional water test kits can struggle to achieve a reading (provided that other aquarium management techniques are adequate). This is very beneficial to a saltwater tank when maintaining the lives sensitive creatures, from fish to coral to microscopic organisms in the water.

Another benefit of a deep sand bed (3 or more inches) is the continuous release of planktonic larvae. These come from the reproductive activities of the organisms within the sand bed. Along with the very low nitrate levels which can be achieved there could also be a continuous supply of fresh food which is beneficial if you are keeping corals which require feeding. For this reason it is important that if the sand bed is not located in the display aquarium but in a sump, it is placed after the skimmer otherwise this fresh food could be skimmed out of the water.

The best sand for a saltwater aquarium deep sand bed is CARIB SEABuilding a deep sand bed is actually quite a simple process but it does depend upon where you are with your aquarium, i.e. are you upgrading an existing system or implementing a new one.

It is recommended you do not add more than 1 inch of sand depth per month to an existing saltwater aquarium sand bed. The reason for this is that you need to give the organisms (which already exist in your existing sand) time to move upwards in the sand. If you add, say, 4 inches of sand at one time, then the organisms would not have had the chance to climb to safety before their oxygen ran out.

A better way is to actually remove any existing sand from the system and start with a fresh sand bed.

Building a sand bed from scratch rather than upgrading really is a simple task to undertake. All you do is purchase the sand of the correct granular size, clean it and put it into your aquarium around the live rock up to the required depth. Once you have added the sand you will need to seed the sand bed with some organisms.

With the introduction of the above and the eventual migration of creatures from the live rock into the sand all you have to do is let good old mother nature get to work.

If you are adding sand into an established tank then you will probably experience a small dust storm. This can easily be removed via mechanical filtration and any dust which has settled on either the corals or live rock can easily be blown off.

Lets go over a few tips.

  1. Small size sand grains below 0.2mm and above 0.05mm must be used. Using sand of the correct size will allow the substrate to be turned over.
  2. Some heavier material (Small live rock no larger than 1cm) may need to be placed on top of the sand if you have a high flow aquarium otherwise the sand will literally blow away and you will have a water based sand storm to deal with.
  3. The depth should be greater than 3 inches to create the required anaerobic areas which are essential for the conversion of nitrate to nitrogen gas. The average depth in the majority of aquariums is between 4 and 6 inches as no benefit has been seen in sand beds greater in depth than this.
  4. Diversity and population will decide if a deep sand bed will filter effectively. The sand bed should be alive with various types of life (copepods, amphipods, brittle stars, bristle worms etc). There are literally hundreds of different species which dwell in and around sand beds serving similar and different roles. The higher the population of organisms the better the sand bed will be able to filter which makes us happy as aquarists.
  5. Increase diversity whenever possible – we do not wish one or two species to become dominant.
  6. Avoid fish and other animals which feed upon life in and on the sand bed as in no time at all the life forms could be decimated. This includes sand sifting star fish.
    Passive sand sifters are a good idea as they help to keep the upper levels clear as well as promoting the re-growth of bacteria in these areas. I recommend that you keep the addition of these sand sifters low as they may remove the food source from getting to other organisms in the sand bed.
  7. Feed the organisms in the sand bed. Feeding increases both diversity and the population. A deep sand bed can deal with a large amount of food. When I say food I do not mean placing fish food etc on the sand bed I mean the food in the water, however feeding frozen fish food to the sand bed is good when you first start the bed as it increases the population. Do not just give the sand bed clean filtered, skimmed water ensure that it does get water which is dirty – i.e. un-filtered and un-skimmed.

A deep sand bed combined with a live rock filtration system is one of the best natural filtration methods currently available to the marine / saltwater aquarium.

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deep sand bed benefits in reef tank

deep sand bed benefits in reef tank

A deep sand bed is commonly defined as a bed of fine sand with a minimum depth of four to six inches which ensures that a portion of the sand at the bottom will not be exposed to significant circulation of water. An established deep sand bed consists of sand populated with bacteria, algae and other marine organisms such as worms, crabs, snails and stars. The creatures burrow and overturn the top two to three inches of sand in search of food, which causes water to circulate deeper in the sand than it would if the creatures were not present.

deep sand bed in marine aquarium
deep sand bed in saltwater aquarium

Check out my saltwater aquarium care channel on YouTube, Rotter Tube Reef

Deep sand beds may be made of a variety of materials, but typically fine or “superfine” sand is used, such as carib sea brand, with a grain size between 1 mm and 0.05 mm. A larger particle size increases circulation, which in turn requires greater depth to establish anaerobic areas. Larger particles can also inhibit the burrowing of small animals, which would limit circulation into the bed. Additionally, larger particles (2 mm or larger) are prone to detritus accumulation (fish waste), which necessitates periodic siphon cleaning.

A finer, smaller grain sand such as carib sea is recommended for saltwater aquariums. A finer sand will not trap fish waste and uneaten fish food and also benefits anaerobic bacteria, which feeds on nitrates in the very low oxygen areas of your aquarium. Anaerobic bacteria live in low oxygen to no oxygen areas of your saltwater tank (deep sand beds have little to no oxygen in the deeper levels of sand.)

Read on to discover what kind of sand is best for your salt water aquarium (also known as marine aquarium) and get the truth about how deep your sand bed should be.

A shallow sand bed (2″ or less depth) has advantages and disadvantages over deep sand beds. To help decide what you need, you need to decide what you want to achieve.

A shallow sand bed measuring 1.5″ to 2″ deep with a fine grade sand is great for a natural looking, brilliant sand bed. The CaribSea Fiji Pink and Aragamax are the two most popular fine grade sands. The fine particle size is great for filtration because there are tons of surface area for bacteria to grow on. A shallow bed is easy to keep clean and will not clog up with detritus (fish waste.) Because the sand is fine and lightweight, it can get blown around easily in reef aquariums with high water flow and you can end up with bare spots on the bottom of the tank. This is easily-fixed by adjusting your power heads in your aquarium.

Using a deep sand bed with fine grain sand is great because of the increased biological filtration.Using a deep sand bed with fine grain sand is great because of the increased biological filtration. A deep sand bed will promote both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria helping to break down waste and remove nitrates from your saltwater tank. A deep sand bed is typically 6″ to 8″ deep. Within the first 2″ to 3″, aerobic bacteria will thrive and help breakdown waste and produce nitrates. As you go deeper into the sand bad, the water will be less oxygenated and therefore anaerobic bacteria will thrive. This type of bacteria is very efficient at denitrification which will turn nitrate into nitrogen gas.

The drawback to a DSB (deep sand bed) is that you need much more sand and it takes up a significant portion of your aquarium. Additionally, there is also the potential for pockets of poisonous hydrogen sulfide to develop if there are not enough organisms to keep the sand bed stirred and clean. Allowing a deep sand bed to become stagnant and full of detritus will eventually cause a big problem in your tank so be sure to maintain a solid clean-up crew with animals such as nassarius snails, sand sifting gobies and starfish, sea cucumbers, conchs and even hermit crabs.

With coarser sand (larger sand grain), you will have less surface area for bacteria to grow on and a higher chance of detritus getting trapped in the sand. The advantages are that because it is heavier, larger grain sand does not get blown around your saltwater aquarium easily and you are less likely to have bare spots at the bottom of your aquarium. Coarser grain sand can also be cleaned with a gravel vacuum during water changes so it is easy to keep clean and free of detritus.

A coarse grain sand bed that is more than 2″ to 3″ inches deep is a dangerous combination because it will quickly become clogged with detritus and increase the nitrate in your tank. Use a fine sand for deep sand bed setup in your saltwater aquarium. You will also have a much greater chance of getting toxic pockets of harmful gas and it is difficult to keep clean, even with a hefty clean-up crew if a larger grain sand is used.

how to lower nitrates with a deep sand bed in saltwater tankOnce you have decided on the type of sand bed you want, you will have some options when it comes the appearance and color of the sand. CaribSea Aragamax and Oolite sand have sort of become the standard for fine grade sand. Both are fine, beige-colored sands that are uniform in color and size.

The CaribSea Fiji Pink and Bimini are also beige colored, fine grade sand with small bits of pink mixed in which gives it a very unique and natural look.

I have 200 pounds of this CaribSea Fiji pink sand in my 125 gallon saltwater aquarium.

With so many choices and the dramatic way sand can transform the appearance of an aquarium, you now see how this is really a worthwhile topic to consider while planning your aquarium build.

Deep Sand Bed Pros– a great big sponge for absorbing phosphates and removing nitrates.

Deep Sand Bed Cons– Deep sand beds will need to be completely replaced at some point. Some reef keepers have kept deep sand beds for 8-10 years. NEVER stir or vacuum through a deep sand bed! This will kill microscopic life that keeps your saltwater tank healthy!

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How to Measure Salinity in a Saltwater Aquarium using a refractometer.

How to Measure Salinity in a Saltwater Aquarium using a refractometer.

Measure Salinity in a Saltwater Aquarium using a refractometer.

I have a YouTube channel on saltwater aquarium care called Rotter Tube Reef, which at the time of this writing has over 11,000 YouTube subscribers.

Salinity (salt) is the most fundamental parameter in a saltwater aquarium. Without salinity, it isn’t saltwater. Because salinity is such an important parameter, it is often overlooked.

Salinity is the measure of dissolved salt content in water. Salinity is typically measured in parts per thousand (ppt) or specific gravity (sg). The more salt in your water, the higher your readings will be. Saltwater aquarium salinity is usually kept between 1.020-1.028sg. Some saltwater aquarium keepers like to keep fish only aquariums at lower levels (1.017+) to keep salt costs low.

As a side note, it has been said by some that lower salt levels will kill parasites in your saltwater tank. THIS IS COMPLETELY FALSE. Only FRESH water will kill saltwater parasites such as ich and marine velvet. Saltwater fish cannot be kept in fresh water for long, but a minute or two is ok.

The lower the salt level in your saltwater tank means there are higher levels of oxygen in your water. The higher the salt level in your saltwater tank means there are lower levels of oxygen in your water.

how to measure salt in saltwater tank with refractometerIf you have a fish only saltwater tank, it is best to keep salinity levels lower, such as at 1.017 or 1.018. You can measure salt levels in your salt water tank using a refractometer.

Many reef aquarium keepers like to maintain salinity at higher levels, sometimes as high as 1.031 because salinity tends to be higher around a reef. A reef has coral and coral thrive with higher salt levels at least 1.028. Choose what is right for your aquarium and make sure it stays stable.

A good refractometer is a precision instrument for measuring salinity. Without getting technical, a refractometer works by measuring how much light “bends” as it passes through the water. As the salinity in the water changes, so does the angle of the refraction, or “bend.” Be sure you are buying a refractometer made for measuring salinity in a saltwater aquarium. Refractometers can be used to measure any number of things, and are calibrated depending on what they were manufactured for.

When you buy a refractometer, and periodically afterwards, you should check the calibration of your instrument. You can use salinity calibration fluid,  or you can use distilled or RO/DI water, which should measure 1.000sg.

how to measure salt in saltwater tank with a refractometer
Salinity measuring just under 1.020

To use a refractometer, place a few drops on the glass plane and then place the clear cover over the sample. Point the refractometer at a bright light source, like your tank. Look through the eyepiece in the back to get the measurement. Your salinity is wherever the colored half of the viewfinder stops.

Salinity is a key parameter to measure for in a saltwater aquarium. Salinity should be one of the first and most frequent tests you do on your saltwater tanks.

Just as water evaporates from the sidewalk after the rain stops, the same goes for your aquarium. Water will evaporate and must be replaced. REPLACE EVAPORATING WATER WITH WATER ONLY! NEVER REPLACE EVAPORATING WATER WITH SALTWATER!

THE ONLY TIME YOU ADD SALT TO YOUR SALTWATER TANK IS WHEN YOU DO A WATER CHANGE AND ARE REMOVING SALTWATER FROM YOUR TANK. If you remove 10 gallons of saltwater, you replace 10 gallons of saltwater.

Water evaporation is only water loss, leaving the salt (a solid) in the tank.

Water evaporation in your saltwater tank results in the salinity level being higher. This makes sense because with less water, there is a higher salt level.

With more fresh water, the salt level is lower, since the salt level is “watered down.”

I replace a gallon of fresh water daily in my 125 gallon saltwater tank due to water evaporation. Some people have purchased auto top off units but I prefer to manually add water daily. It’s no big deal. I add water when I feed the fish each night.

You can purchase this Refractometer and read the Amazon reviews HERE

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How to kill green hair algae in a saltwater aquarium

How to kill green hair algae in a saltwater aquarium

Getting rid of green hair algae in a saltwater tank brings enough stress to drive you crazy. Green Hair Algae in a saltwater aquarium is incredibly difficult to get rid of and will make you want to quit the saltwater aquarium hobby. I have a 125 gallon saltwater tank and host the YouTube channel Rotter Tube Reef.

After trying everything to get rid of green hair algae in my saltwater tank, I found something that truly works and the green hair algae never came back! People said cover your aquarium so no light hits it, use phosphate rx, feed your fish less, etc etc and NOTHING WORKED! Hydrogen Peroxide dosing worked and the green hair algae was gone for good with very little effort.

Food grade hydrogen peroxide, at the 12% concentration level, dosed at 3ml per 10 gallons of aquarium water, did the trick! This is the hydrogen peroxide I used but any 12% rated hydrogen peroxide should work fine for you. It did not harm my inverts or corals. Corals did close up a bit for a few days but came back with no issues.

I could write a very long post on green hair algae, commonly referred to as GHA, but I will not. The purpose of this post is to let you know what I did to kill off all the incredibly nasty green hair algae in my saltwater tank in less than a week.

Green Hair Algae gets its name because it looks like silky green hair. It will start off in your aquarium as flat green spots on the rock. If you let it grow, it will get out of control fast, resembling hair, which is connected to your glass tank walls, rock and anything it can attach to. Once Green Hair Algae gets a foothold in a saltwater aquarium, it can soon cover everything in your tank if prompt measures are not taken.

how to kill green hair algae with hydrogen peroxide
green hair algae spreads like cancer in a saltwater tank

The cure for Green Hair Algae is the same as the prevention: Starve it into oblivion. Green Hair Algae require not only light but also nitrates and phosphates in order to survive. Nitrates can be introduced into an aquarium not only as the end product of the Nitrogen Cycling Process (ammonia/nitrite/nitrate) but also via some brands of commercial sea salts and tap water.

Phosphate (PO4) is a part of life on earth. Virtually every living thing contains some phosphates and they can enter the tank in a number of ways. Fish & critter foods, tap water, and carbon are some of the phosphate generators in your tank. This is why it is important to NOT OVERFEED YOUR FISH!

There are many fixes on the internet for getting rid of green hair algae. Being that this evil feeds off sunlight, it is strongly advised to not place your aquarium by a window, when initially setting it up. Although this is good advice, my tank has been by a window for years with no issue.

You need to have only PURE WATER when making saltwater for your aquarium. For this reason, find a reef store that has PURE saltwater or make your own at home with the use of an RODI walter filter system. NEVER use tap water when making saltwater or topping off your tank from evaporation.

People have done all types of things to rid their tanks of GHA and I’m one of them. Although some of these products are great, they will not work in all aquariums. Some items to try include phosphate RX, fluconazole for fish, seachem phosguard, red sea nopox and others.

What worked best for me is dosing the tank with 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide. 12% hydrogen peroxide works just as well, using 2ml of hydrogen peroxide per 10 gallons of aquarium water. The GHA in my tank was out of control and hydrogen peroxide worked perfect. I dosed 2ml for every 10 gallons every other day for a week. For best results, turn off all pumps so your water is very still. Get a syringe to measure the amount and gently dose over a rock with green hair algae. Leave pumps off for 10 minutes then power up. Do this to different parts of your tank until all is gone. The rest of the hydrogen peroxide will flow through the entire water column in your aquarium, dissolving other green hair algae.

The removal of green hair algae will drive you crazy. Check out this video I made that shows how I killed it with hydrogen peroxide. It never came back.

 

Make sure not to get the hydrogen peroxide on your skin, as it will irritate it. Use gloves and practice caution. This hydrogen peroxide will not harm fish, corals or invertebrates. Corals may close up for a couple of days, which is normal.

I have seen the 35% hydrogen peroxide show up as not available at times. The biggest reason for this is it’s hard to keep in stock. If this is the case and you want it now, the 12% will work well and you can dose double the amount. My experience is with the 35% and it works perfectly. Green hair algae does not return.

If you have any questions let me know. I spent weeks researching and most things did not work on my disgusting tank. 35% food grade hydrogen peroxide did the trick and turned my tank from nasty to crystal clear.

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I’m a video editor of 25 years, audio engineer 20 years, photographer 25 years and guitarist 20 years. I post photography and stop motion animation videos, but mainly guitar playing.

 

 

 

saltwater aquarium led lighting by Finnex

Saltwater aquarium led lighting is the best lighting you can have for your tank. LED lighting is cheaper, less expensive to run and looks much better than T5 lighting.

Checkout my YouTube channel, Rotter Tube Reef. I post weekly saltwater aquarium care videos each Saturday.

I have used both LED lighting and T5 lighting for my 125 gallon saltwater tank. I love LED lighting the most for reasons stated in the beginning of this post. Finnex LED lighting is best and inexpensive and great for saltwater aquariums. I highly recommend you check them out.

Those into the saltwater tank hobby will know what I’m talking about. Those just entering the hobby will learn something. The rest of you will say what the hell is he talking about? That’s ok.

saltwater tank help by rotter tube reef on youtube

T5 lighting is what I currently have above my saltwater tank, not only for light, but to feed the coral. A T5 light is basically a hanging shop light that uses special bulbs. These bulbs need to be replaced each year and are around $15 each. I have a 4 bulb unit. The T5 light I have is great but it’s just too much light for my tank, which is a 125 gallon saltwater aquarium that is 6′ long.

T5 lighting can also result in green hair algae growth. GHA is gross and almost impossible to get rid of. It happened to me. My beautiful saltwater aquarium looked like a moss swamp. There is less chance growing green hair algae with LED lighting.

REASONS LED LIGHTING IS BETTER

  • LED lighting doesn’t cost much electricity to run
  • LED lighting doesn’t need to be replaced once a year like T5 lighting
  • LED has less of a chance growing green hair algae
  • LED lighting can be cheaper depending on what light you buy
  • LED lighting gives off much less heat, if any at all
  • LED lighting is lighter and looks better when attached to a saltwater tank

My current light setup is a T5 light suspended over the saltwater tank. Some people attach the light to their ceiling, which I will never do. That would look tacky in my house.

I spray painted gas pipes from home depot and attached them to the back of my tank to suspend my T5 lighting. I will use these same mounts to suspend the lighter LED lights by Finnex when they arrive.

Finnex LED lighting is meant to sit on top of the tank lids but I don’t use lids and the longest light they have is 48″. My saltwater tank is 72″ long. I will suspend the 48″ Finnex marine light about 6 inches from the top of my tank using those same DIY light hangers.

finnex led lights for saltwater tank

The LED lights by Finnex I ordered are only white light and blue light. This is PERFECT for a saltwater tank since white lights brighten and blue lights feed the coral. Other lighting such as the MARS Aqua, which I looked at, are a little pricier and have some red LED in them. I don’t want red lighting of any kind, as this will feed algae in the tank.

If I go back to glass lids, I can just rest the 48″ Finnex light on those. Not sure if I will ever go back to glass lids since the salt creep (salt from splashing saltwater tank) blocks the light from shining through the glass. I use mesh lids, which are better for oxygenating the tank water.

Thanks for reading and let me know what you are using in the comments section below. Don’t forget to check out my YouTube channel, Rotter Tube Reef, if you’re into the saltwater tank hobby.

Subscribe to my blog here if you like what I write about.

Steve

www.steverotter.com

www.rottertubereef.com

 

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How to kill ich and marine velvet in a saltwater tank

How to kill ich and marine velvet in a saltwater tank
I’m going to tell you how to kill ich and marine velvet parasites in a saltwater tank for good, once and for all, forever. I have a 125 gallon saltwater tank and have been in the hobby for 5 years. The saltwater aquarium hobby requires a lot of research. In all the animals I have taken care of, saltwater tanks are the most intense, expensive and difficult. Things can go bad fast, especially if you have ich parasites in your tank.
Before we get into it, I want you to know that what I’m about to tell you absolutely positively works! Your saltwater aquarium will be healthy with no ich parasites in your saltwater tank. I have helped many combat and destroy the ich parasite in their reef tank.
I have a YouTube channel in the saltwater tank hobby with over 11,000 YouTube subscribers at the time of this writing. Come check us out at Rotter Tube Reef.

WHAT IS AN ICH PARASITE?

Are your saltwater fish dying for no reason? Gasping for air and not eating? Not moving? Hiding? It’s called Ich or Marine Velvet in your saltwater aquarium. This nasty parasite is a silent killer. Many saltwater aquarium keepers know about this nasty parasite all too well and most don’t know how to get rid of it.
The Ich parasite embeds itself in the flesh of fish and eats. After a few days it drops off in the sand bed and encrusts in a cell. The ich parasites multiply, releasing hundreds more parasites into your tank. The parasites seek out a fish to host, embed themselves in its flesh and eat from the inside out again! Fish die quickly. Marine Velvet is worse and is capable of killing all fish in your saltwater aquarium in a matter of days, if not hours.
I learned the hard way by losing most of my fish to marine velvet when I was starting out in the saltwater aquarium hobby. My water parameters were fine, water temperature was fine, and yet, my saltwater fish were dying.
The local reef store knew nothing about Ich or marine velvet, which, now that I know what the deal is, I find VERY hard to believe they knew “nothing.”
I sent photos of my fish, which I bought from them. The fish was covered in what looked like salt, which is the Ich parasite under the skin of the saltwater fish. I brought the blue tang fish (Dory fish) to them, and they had no idea. They sold me a wrasse fish to “eat” any parasite that might be on the fish. Such idiots. I will never shop there again.
Ich parasites multiply at an alarming rate. There is no way that wrasse fish would have taken them out. The wrasse died 2 days later and had white salt flecks all over its body. The wrasse died from ich parasites as well.
Other people in the saltwater tank hobby, including many on YouTube, say such things as, “once Ich is in your tank, it’s always in your tank.” I’m so sick of hearing this BS! Another thing you’ll hear is “garlic kills Ich parasites.” Again, total BS! I know what works and what doesn’t.
Let me make one thing clear! ICH parasites CAN be removed from your saltwater aquarium FOREVER and garlic does NOTHING to kill them either.
how to kill ich in saltwater tank
Ich parasites on a saltwater fish. Eating him alive.
AVOID WEBSITES AND FORUMS with CURE ICH FAST schemes!
Some people in the saltwater aquarium hobby, as in all walks of life, just go about doing what they are told. They don’t research or find anything out on their own. They believe what is told to them and that’s where they fail. When they read about others using garlic to kill ich, or any other silly myth, it just confirms they do no research to see what really works.
The truth needs to be told. One saltwater tank forum in particular, reef central, is filled with arguing, bad attitudes and overall, for the most part, the blind leading the blind. You will find MANY get rid of ich quick schemes, all of which DO NOT WORK! I never visit this forum, as it’s filled with a lot of haters and bad attitudes, especially if you’re new to the hobby.
SIGNS YOUR SALTWATER FISH HAS ICH
1. Scraping against rock or sand bed to scratch an itch. They swipe alongside rocks or sand. This is an attempt to get the parasites off of them. They are being eaten by ich parasites and it’s torture.
2. Fish in bad stages of Ich or Marine Velvet will not eat. They will hover, staring out into space, not interested in anything.
3. Fish will hide and not come out, not eat, and not do anything.
4. In general, you know your fish is not acting the way they normally do. Some will start to spin out of control, swim sideways, or upside down.
5. White spots resembling salt on their body. This is the ich parasite embedded inside the fish, eating it alive. Some reefers think when the salt specks are gone, so is the ich parasite. This is FALSE! After the parasites eat, they drop off into your sand bed to encrust in a shell to multiply! After hundreds / thousands more are born, they are released into your tank looking for food….YOUR FISH!

THE CYCLE MUST BE BROKEN!

I KNOW what you need to do. I know what has worked for me and many others I’ve helped. It’s a rock solid solution. Read on.
Saltwater ich and marine velvet and oodinium is a parasite not a disease. It must be removed permanently from your aquarium. Feeding your fish well is not enough. I wanted to share what I have learned about ich and marine velvet to help your fish and aquarium stay healthy.  I put a lot of research and time into my book and it works! I have cured many saltwater aquariums using these easy-to-follow steps. You will be very happy and your fish will thrive!
Unfortunately, in the saltwater tank hobby, there are many myths on how to kill the ich parasite and marine velvet. I’ll say it again…one of the biggest lies every told is once you have ich parasites in your saltwater aquarium you will always have ich. This is completely false.
Ich parasites can be eradicated forever if you follow simple steps. The same goes for marine velvet. Marine velvet will wipe out all your fish in a matter of hours, a couple days at the most.
Another huge lie you’ll hear is garlic kills ich by feeding it to your fish. This is completely ridiculous. They believe that mixing fish food with garlic entices the fish to eat, thus making them stronger to fight off the ich parasite. Ridiculous! The ich parasite eat fish from the inside out. No amount of food or vitamins will prevent the parasites from eating your fish. Here’s a video I made to help others with the removal of the ich parasite and marine velvet forever.
This video shows WHAT NOT TO DO:
In order to remove Ich parasites from your saltwater aquarium, you must remove all fish from your main saltwater aquarium for 6 weeks. Fish go in another aquarium where you will take care of them and nurse them back to health.
Your main display tank will remain fishless for 6 weeks. Removing the saltwater fish from your aquarium will kill the ich parasites and marine velvet. WHY? You just removed the food source for ich and marine velvet. With no food, they will die. This process takes 6 weeks minium. After 6 weeks, your saltwater fish can go back into your display tank.
There are other steps to follow but those are the basics. I wrote a book that walks you through the entire process, step by step and what to look out for. This goes for anything new you buy for your saltwater aquarium, be it fish or coral or inverts.
To learn the entire process, pick up my book on Amazon and also check out my YouTube channel for more videos on how to kill ich a marine velvet, along with saltwater aquarium care.
Click HERE to view and order my ebook on Amazon.
how to kill in in a saltwater reef tank forever
How to kill the ich parasite and marine velvet forever, by Steve Rotter. Available on Amazon.
Not only for those who just can’t get rid of ich in their tanks, but also for those just starting the hobby. Ich is brought up in very good detail!, and not only ich, we also get to know about some other common parasites which i personally think was a great idea to include as well. And as long as you follow the authors guidelines, you will most likely be able to prevent parasite introduction in the first place..Give it a read!
You can kill ich and marine velvet forever if you follow the steps. I haven’t had issues at all. Good Luck!
If you found this helpful, subscribe to my blog to get notified of new posts once they’re uploaded.
Steve

My You Tube channels:

German Shepherd Weekly: Weekly short videos of my german shepherd, Leia
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ROTTER TUBE REEF: saltwater aquarium care                                                                         The Joker Box: The Joker Impression – Tribute to Heath Ledger

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I’m a GUITAR PLAYER. Check out my music and purchase here:

MIME RIOT
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ON iTunes:
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https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/wraith/139284491
MIME RIOT
https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/fear-ep/793322130

http://www.steverotter.com

I’m a video editor of 25 years, audio engineer 20 years, photographer 25 years and guitarist 20 years. I post photography and stop motion animation videos, but mainly guitar playing.

My You Tube channels:

German Shepherd Weekly: Weekly short videos of my german shepherd, Leia
ROTTER studios: photography, film, movies, music                                                           ROTTER TUBE REEF: saltwater aquarium care                                                                         The Joker Box: The Joker Impression – Tribute to Heath Ledger